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View Full Version : Tall skinny or Big Boggers?


RAW
06-21-2009, 11:26 AM
I got really stuck in some deep snow a few months back and i was told that tall skinny tires would be best for deep stuff like snow or even mud. What are your opinions? Please use the poll comment as well.

My next tire purchase could depend on which way this poll goes.

Thx!

B
06-21-2009, 11:38 AM
can not aswer this with out spec of your junk weight, power, clearance, all makes a huge differance to how a tire will preform in said conditions ...

B ...

Lynx
06-21-2009, 12:18 PM
yea it depends.

for the most part tow trucks and vehicles working on the pavement when it gets snowy/icy use skinny tall tires because they will dig down through the snow and get to pavement where the most traction is.

But for really deep snow (where you don't have the clearance) or just snow on dirt I think it takes a different tactic.

thatshott101
06-21-2009, 02:05 PM
i have ran taller skinny tires and i hate them, but thats just me, dig down too deep too fast, not a fan of boggers though, they do look badass though(this is squishy forgot to log in under my name)

MikeWild
06-21-2009, 02:11 PM
in snow I found that a wider footprint is better for getting you up and on top of the snow, I was running 34x10.5 LTB's and all they did was dig and I'd get nowhere, when I swapped on my 35x12.5 MTRs, I found they were better for getting me up and on top of the snow. But that's just my 2 cents.

Ginger Snaps
06-21-2009, 02:55 PM
wider the tire the more floatation you will have...

regulate34
06-21-2009, 03:02 PM
i have always found narrower tires to have more traction
you get more psi on the tire to the ground

but i am young and havent ran a lot of direrant tires

Zibi
06-21-2009, 03:34 PM
narrow tires are to cut through the snow/mud and reach the firm ground underneath. They're completely pointless if you don't have the clearance or it's simply too deep to reach the bottom.

if you want to stay on top then you'd want a really wide, low pressure tire.

regulate34
06-21-2009, 04:09 PM
narrow tires are to cut through the snow/mud and reach the firm ground underneath. They're completely pointless if you don't have the clearance or it's simply too deep to reach the bottom.

if you want to stay on top then you'd want a really wide, low pressure tire.

makes sence but it has alot to do with what your wheelin in or on

m j
06-21-2009, 04:27 PM
snow wheelin vehicle needs big footprint tires, as you are trying to float on top
everything else is gonna want narrow
you can get a big foot print with a narrow tire, but it would have to be a huge tire like a 49" XL to have a long enough footprint

boyzen
06-21-2009, 05:21 PM
skinnys only work in conditions where airing down makes it worse. I ran into this a few times out ,usually a sugary not real deep type of snow .In most cases it is better to air down, which means a taller wider tire is going to optimize your travel in the snow and mud.

Trailjunkie
06-21-2009, 05:36 PM
MikeWildin snow I found that a wider footprint is better for getting you up and on top of the snow, I was running 34x10.5 LTB's and all they did was dig and I'd get nowhere, when I swapped on my 35x12.5 MTRs, I found they were better for getting me up and on top of the snow. But that's just my 2 cents. yeah im running 34 by 10.5 lbt's and for every terrain out there except deep snow they are way better than my 35 by 12.5 wide mudders. espesialy rocky terrain and logs.[cheers]

Apathy
06-22-2009, 08:44 AM
95% of the time,

larger footprint.

when the snow gets "granulated" nothing works unless you can get to the bottom.

RAW
06-22-2009, 09:04 AM
I ment in general.... but I guess I need to be a bit more specific. I have an 05 Blazer with tons of clearance.

Link to my photo album
http://picasaweb.google.com/ran.wright/ChurchFeb012009StaveLake#

http://lh3.ggpht.com/_HSKib98fado/SYi46IAqnqI/AAAAAAAAAXI/tJgETrEXRiA/churchfeb109024.jpg

Apathy
06-22-2009, 09:14 AM
nothing wrong with the tires you have, except you have about 10lbs too much air in them.

oh, and take a grooving iron to them.

'Balmer
06-22-2009, 11:54 AM
Good advice all through this thread. all I'd add is SIPING the more the better.

Apathy
06-22-2009, 11:57 AM
no, not siping.... GROOVING

siping is adding little tiney rasor cuts, grooving removes material

B
06-22-2009, 12:16 PM
nothing wrong with the tires you have, except you have about 10lbs too much air in them.

oh, and take a grooving iron to them.



bang on with both statements .... [cheers] [cheers]

Ginger Snaps
06-22-2009, 12:23 PM
air the fuck down get them groved and dont spin your tires in the snow...spining=diggin creep it and slowly build momentum

Apathy
06-22-2009, 12:25 PM
If you really want to learn snow wheeling....

Get this.. No joke... (but he'll make it one)





go snow wheeling with Warlord.

He tought me tons about snow wheeling..
Me and him broke trail in about 5' of snow up harrison.

MikeWild
06-22-2009, 12:29 PM
go snow wheeling with Warlord.

He tought me tons about snow wheeling..
Me and him broke trail in about 5' of snow up harrison.

walking out of the bush to get help for a broken jeep doesn't qualify as 'breaking trail'

:D :D :D [f]

Apathy
06-22-2009, 12:34 PM
we didn't walk.. we had parts to fix it on the road.

Happypants
06-22-2009, 02:56 PM
Good advice all through this thread. all I'd add is SIPING the more the better.

siping is a horrible thing to do and a complete waste of tires, groove them, not sipe them, grooving them lets the tread flex better and also helps to pull water and such out away from the middle of the tire, siping tries to do the same thing but in fact causes the tires to wear faster, cause chunking and is just a bad idea,

Happypants
06-22-2009, 02:59 PM
I ment in general.... but I guess I need to be a bit more specific. I have an 05 Blazer with tons of clearance.

Link to my photo album
http://picasaweb.google.com/ran.wright/ChurchFeb012009StaveLake#

http://lh3.ggpht.com/_HSKib98fado/SYi46IAqnqI/AAAAAAAAAXI/tJgETrEXRiA/churchfeb109024.jpg

yea and remember how much more traction i had with 8psi than you did, even though we have the same tires, but mine are grooved

Apathy
06-22-2009, 03:07 PM
yea and remember how much more traction i had with 8psi than you did, even though we have the same tires, but mine are grooved

8psi in the snow?
thats for rocks.

try more like 5

RAW
06-22-2009, 03:15 PM
yea and remember how much more traction i had with 8psi than you did, even though we have the same tires, but mine are grooved


So I guess grooved tires do make a huge difference... cause yours was totally fine in that rut.

StillRYE
06-22-2009, 03:43 PM
Flotation is where its at.

Happypants
06-22-2009, 04:54 PM
Jer, I was at 8psi cuz I have beadless aluminum rims, otherwise I would be down lower than 5 psi,

Trailjunkie
06-22-2009, 05:11 PM
yeah i stay between 7 and ten till i get bead lock's. what do you guys think of those internal bead locks? they look cool.

Apathy
06-22-2009, 05:36 PM
PM stepside, although i never see him on here anymore.
He has the stauns

Cheese eyes
06-22-2009, 06:14 PM
Mmmmmmm snow !!!oh yeah you want bigger wider and low to none psi groveing does help alot but not always necessary it all comes down to the driver and his ability [cheers]
i have seen some of the best built snow machines get stuck and other not so built trucks go right around and around and around them :D

Ginger Snaps
06-22-2009, 06:41 PM
[h] the snow god[h]

desteurm
06-24-2009, 11:23 AM
I drove up to Birkenhead (Private Land End) at the end of December and when I got up there everyone was asking me how I got up. I pointed to a little ford ranger with bald-ish 29" tires. They were all pissed off because my POS made it and they all had to take the snow machines up. The road had a pretty thick crust on it so that may have helped.

Troy
06-24-2009, 11:27 AM
thats a wicked picture mike!

RAW
06-24-2009, 11:35 AM
So airing down to a single digit PSI sounds like the easiest way to do things... instead of buying new tires for each application, just change the tires you have for each application. Also, get a grooving iron and go to town on the tires seems like it will help quite a bit.

How much does the weight of the vehicle play in all this? I understand that a big beast that weighs 3700 LBS will sink more than a little truck that weighs 2500 LBS but how much weight can you put on a set of aired down tires before it becomes useless?

Also, I am looking at the Mattracks " http://www.mattracks.com/ but they are upwards of 15K for a set. Does anyone know how to make a good set of tracks or a less expensive set?

Here is a You tube video of them in use and it seems impressive to me, would like comments. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkleAMR3IyI

Apathy
06-24-2009, 11:38 AM
for grooving, get in with some of the guys here... there are many tire groovers around.
Im sure they would do it for a six pack and a doobie

If i was closer, i'd do it for ya for above price

Little Samurai
06-24-2009, 04:26 PM
While I agree that you want a wider tire for floatation purposes how wide depends on the type of snow you are driving on, how heavy your vehicle is, how you drive it etc. For your truck I don't see why a 12.5" tire wouldn't be plenty wide enough. I don't know what to say about height since "plenty of clearance" doesn't tell us much but you could fit say a 33-36" tall tire. As for boggers they are fuckin' heavy and grip so well on certain surfaces that you will probably tear up a stock drivetrain in no time and they don't have a lot of latteral traction on snow and ice. That being said I am not personally a big fan of boggers in snow.

'Balmer
06-24-2009, 04:42 PM
I'm pretty sure there's no one who would argue that there's a set of tires out there that can be compared to Mattracks in the snow, those things are wild! For the price of them I'd say you're rig would need to be an all-year dedicated snow wheeler for sure... unless you're rich that is. I would like to see how well the tracks work on other surfaces - they have a few promo vids of road and rocks n' stuff but thery're really cheezy little clips that don't offer much.

xtremeyj
06-24-2009, 05:57 PM
I run pitbulls in the 40 by 16.5 wide series on a 3900 pound jeep. Those tires at about 4 psi take me in the snow where I need to go.

RAW
06-24-2009, 06:04 PM
I don't think my post with the image is working for some of you because I think you need to have a Google account. So here is another pic of the truck... as you can see I have quite a of clearance.

36" Boggers on it as well.

http://ran.wright.googlepages.com/churchfeb109024.jpg

Apathy
06-24-2009, 06:17 PM
ya, i saw the tires and clearance and still stand by my pervious posts

nothing wrong with those tires, except 10psi too much and they need grooved.

thats what i run, and my rig does exceptionally well in the snow.
your rig is comparable in weight and wheelbase to mine. (probably lighter)