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Chris.S.
10-29-2008, 01:01 PM
Given the current situation, I think for some of us that are newer to the sport a discussion about how to evaluate strap life might be good.

Mods, this thread is intended to be educational only, if it is viewed as being (or becomes) disrespectful or if this discussion has already taken please delete this thread.

But how many pulls can you get from a strap over it's life? Just a thought.

That's a good question, is there any way to tell when a strap is reaching the end of it's usability?

I have feeling it's like my climbing ropes and there is no way to definitively tell. All you can do is keep a mental list of how many times it's been stressed and replace when it the first time you think to yourself "Maybe I should replace my strap soon". Of course straps (and all recovery gear) should be inspected regularly to monitor for nicks, frays, cyts or tears, at the first sign of any of those the item should be retired.

Maybe someone with more experience/knowledge wants to ring in?


:dontknow:

pumpkin
10-29-2008, 02:00 PM
Given what has happened, I plan on making some slip over protectors. I have some belting from the grain elevators, and the plan is to cut some pieces about 2ft x 2ft, with a 2" or 3" hole in the center. Slip these over the strap, or winch cable, and they should hopefully absorb, and or parachute the strap or cable when a failure happens. I have broken many straps, some even new. I have just been lucky enough (so far) as to not have injured my self or someone else. My truck on the other hand, has a couple of big dents and holes from straps and anchor points breaking.

m j
10-29-2008, 07:19 PM
the main issue is to never attach a heavy piece of steel to something that can break.
a broken strap seems reasonably harmless to me, unless it has a lump of steel still attached to it.
I have broken dozens (at least) of chains pulling stuff, a handful of cables, lots of straps.
a broken strap will hurt you, a piece of steel will end you.

everyone should be looking at tow points very carefully.
can you lift the entire vehicle from that tow point? if not then dont use it.

snatching is dangerous and fawks stuff up, a nice gentle winching is always a better idea IMO

ROBO
10-29-2008, 07:31 PM
some things i know about straps.. from experiance.. after a day at stave or other places were its muddy/sandy its a realy good idea too wash and dry out your straps good.. the sand gets into the strands and weres them out real fast.. and moldy straps can weaken them up.,left toolong ive seen some straps in a wet pile startin too rot! .. after every stave tow i pressuer wash mine out and hang them too dry. and try too use the proper strap for the job too.. tug straps for tuggin and load strps for anchoring.. tree savers etc..a small amout of tlc and respect too your lines will pay off huge in the long run..

dirka dave
10-29-2008, 07:33 PM
You got to check your equipment all the time.......

Trooper
10-29-2008, 08:27 PM
Straps are cheap. tailgates and rear windows are expensive. I use mine only a few times before I toss them. I have seen poeple run there straps through a rubber sleeve kinda like a condom with the end cut off. They work good incase of a breakage.

Nutbar
10-29-2008, 08:31 PM
for the most part straps are like rigging ropes other than visible tears and frays you can't tell how worn a strap is inside the webbing so as Dirka said always, ALWAYS inspect your recovery gear, if it is questionable DON'T USE IT. Robo made a good point most people don't realize proper cleaning and care for your straps is a must, and the right type of strap for the job at hand, and for the newbies or the uninformed there are different types of straps. A recovery strap (which is what you should be using for tugging stuck vehicles) is quite a bit different than a loading (sling) strap, a recovery strap is like a giant elastic band, it has a large amount of stretch to it, this is to prevent the sudden impact you would get when you use a load strap or a chain to tug somebody, that impact can cause lots of damage and/or flying parts.

when you are buying straps the heavier the load capacity the better, yes this is a time when bigger is DEFINATELY better

and one last thing NEVER NEVER shackle 2 or more straps together if a strap breaks the shackle will again become a projectile, if you must link straps together, thread them together with the loops and weave a short piece of stick through the loops that way when the straps sinch themselves tight together if you are unable to undo them you can break the stick out from the not and that will loosen the straps from each other

MuddyWheeler
10-29-2008, 10:33 PM
thanks guys, there is some good info here:p

D-Ass
10-30-2008, 01:32 AM
hay guys here I go!

i have been a licensed rigger for 6 years and now I build and do safety inspections on heavy commercial equipment like linesman trucks for power companies, tellus, davey tree, altec power.......! (and yes I am cert.)

the life span of any rope is 3 years used in durty,wet, sandy places.

#1 if cut in ANY spot it is no good
#2 frayed in no more than 3 strands per lay

slings are dated with a yellow or red tag with the date of manufacture and are good up to 5 years.

#1 if cut in any spot it is no good
#2 frayed in no more than 5 strands per inch

wire rope dose not have a life shelf as other things do (but common scents should be used)

wire rope is no good when any of the following come into account

#1 3 frayed strands per lay
#2 a indent or bulge in the outer strands (would indicate the inner strands have torn or stretched)
#3 rust
#4 a separation between the lays ( a gap between the twisted strands)
#5 a perminent kink in the cable

you should all ways use some sort of "dead man" at the end of your cable (or sling)

a cheep and easy thing for wire rope or rope is to get a hocky puck and drill a hole in the center a little smaller than the cable make a cut from the outer to the center to slide your cable through then run a screw to hold the two halves tight together place about 1-2 feet frome the end.

for a sling or strap cut a piece of rubber about 1 1/2 feet long make 2 slits about 6" frome ither end and run your strap through the slit space out to make a nice U shape

evan a shirt or towel over the line would suffice

the safe loadind for any strap and rope is 4x the load that it is hooked to (if doing a tug I would go up to 6x)

the safe loading for a wire rope is 2 1/2 x

the safe work load for hook points and "gear" (hooks shackles....) is 4x the load

remember this is just a quick wright up of some of the things that we should be aware of. if un sure you can check the manufacturer website or give me a pm and I will give you a hand.


[cheers]

Super Bitch
10-30-2008, 04:47 PM
LIke I told skuzzy at Stave that day, when a guy came by on a quad and told him he should of known better, that most people dont learn these things or see the importance until something happens. The ones that usually say things like "you should of known" have been around the block a few times and have seen what happens already!:)

redman
10-30-2008, 04:54 PM
Given the current situation, I think for some of us that are newer to the sport a discussion about how to evaluate strap life might be good.

Mods, this thread is intended to be educational only, if it is viewed as being (or becomes) disrespectful or if this discussion has already taken please delete this thread.



That's a good question, is there any way to tell when a strap is reaching the end of it's usability?

I have feeling it's like my climbing ropes and there is no way to definitively tell. All you can do is keep a mental list of how many times it's been stressed and replace when it the first time you think to yourself "Maybe I should replace my strap soon". Of course straps (and all recovery gear) should be inspected regularly to monitor for nicks, frays, cyts or tears, at the first sign of any of those the item should be retired.

Maybe someone with more experience/knowledge wants to ring in?


:dontknow:

good discussion to have,

I just got some new ones and I am going to toss my old ones out just for peace of mind to know that they are new.

Happypants
10-30-2008, 05:10 PM
usually i replace straps yearly, wether there still in good condition or not, if you dont wash the strap out from a day of playing in stave mud, it will rot quickly then its trash anyways, starts fraying, i toss it cause good chance is it will break soon anyways,

but i perfer winching to pulling on a strap, up at whipsaw i managed to bend my hitch trying to pull out a buddy that was high centered, winching is more controlled and not so hard on a vehicle

fullsizebronco
11-02-2008, 01:42 PM
ya i can say any strap can break at anytime we had more than a few brand new straps out with us last night and the small ones just dont cut it if you want to pull someone i agree the BIGGER the better and we had to attach straps to but we never do it with shackles i dont plan on getting one to the back of my head i still crouch in my seat when pulling i could care less about hurting a truck thats easy to fix people not so much!

Chris.S.
11-02-2008, 01:59 PM
I've been kicking around the idea of making a metal plate with rubber feet coming off the top so you could just "hang" it off the cab and over the back window when it's time for a tug..

Kinda bulky to carry around though, maybe removable feet so it would just tuck away somewhere....

Rye Guy
11-02-2008, 02:07 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by rockrawler http://www.funinbc.com/forum/images/approx/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.funinbc.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1329241#post1329241)
But how many pulls can you get from a strap over it's life? Just a thought.
sat cowshit wheelin? 'bout 5 times.:( Thanks for the strap F150 Hulk[cheers]

dirka dave
11-02-2008, 03:35 PM
I've been using mine for a few years, I don't drag it around and I inspect it on a regular basis...