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Bigsexy
12-17-2009, 02:46 PM
does anybody no if the 96 wiring harness under the dash is compatable with the 93 engine harness. i was told to find out if they were or not.. everythings plugged in but still no start. anybod able to help me out or guide me in the right direction.. [cheers]

the 93 is a 460 harness and the 96 had an inline 6 in it..

Nutbar
12-17-2009, 04:01 PM
Probably not. When I worked the wrecking yards the fords were the absolute worst for trying to sell wiring harnesses from, every different option layout, ie. power windows, power locks, made for comppletely different harnesses. We had to know exactly what options and year to even try to sell a harness

epic3
12-17-2009, 06:18 PM
does the ecu have ground? It needs chassis ground as well as battery ground.

the ecu harness grounds are the small black wires at the ground terminal.

Bigsexy
12-17-2009, 08:18 PM
ive done a lil research and ive read that 96 is when they came out with OBD2... not OBD1 and that would throw it out of wack.. i dont understand wat this obd1 or 2 is.. could someone put it in dummy terms..

Nutbar
12-17-2009, 11:58 PM
To put it in simplest terms in 1996, OBD2 was a manufacturers standardization of electronics diagnostic protocalls and programming so one generalized scanning tool can be used to read the ECUs of all the manufacturers. Also included in this standardization came new emissions protocalls. This was done to make it easier for any tech to diagnose and repair any electronics or emissions related problems.

Prior to 96 "OBD1", and technically there wasn't any real designation OBD1, was whatever programming, diagnostic procedures/tools, and electronics the manufacturer wanted to use to comply with government emissions legislation.

B
12-18-2009, 07:51 AM
ive done a lil research and ive read that 96 is when they came out with OBD2... not OBD1 and that would throw it out of wack.. i dont understand wat this obd1 or 2 is.. could someone put it in dummy terms..

To put it in simplest terms in 1996, OBD2 was a manufacturers standardization of electronics diagnostic protocalls and programming so one generalized scanning tool can be used to read the ECUs of all the manufacturers. Also included in this standardization came new emissions protocalls. This was done to make it easier for any tech to diagnose and repair any electronics or emissions related problems.

Prior to 96 "OBD1", and technically there wasn't any real designation OBD1, was whatever programming, diagnostic procedures/tools, and electronics the manufacturer wanted to use to comply with government emissions legislation.


[wako] ...

On-Board Diagnostics, or OBD, in an automotive (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automotive) context, is a generic term referring to a vehicle's self-diagnostic and reporting capability. OBD systems give the vehicle owner or a repair technician access to state of health information for various vehicle sub-systems. The amount of diagnostic information available via OBD has varied widely since the introduction in the early 1980s of on-board vehicle computers, which made OBD possible. Early instances of OBD would simply illuminate a malfunction indicator light (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malfunction_indicator_lamp), or MIL, if a problem was detected—but would not provide any information as to the nature of the problem. Modern OBD implementations use a standardized fast digital communications port to provide realtime data in addition to a standardized series of diagnostic trouble codes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_of_OBD-II_Codes), or DTCs, which allow one to rapidly identify and remedy malfunctions within the vehicle.


OBD-II is an improvement over OBD-I in both capability and standardization. The OBD-II standard specifies the type of diagnostic connector and its pinout, the electrical signalling protocols available, and the messaging format. It also provides a candidate list of vehicle parameters to monitor along with how to encode the data for each. Finally, the OBD-II standard provides an extensible list of DTCs. As a result of this standardization, a single device can query the on-board computer(s) in any vehicle. This OBD-II came in 2 models OBD-IIA and OBD-IIB.



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